Student-Centered in an Open World

At my university, we use the phrase “student-centered” all the time.  Sometimes it’s in non-controversial ways (mostly we all agree that collaborative classrooms are student-centered, that internships and experiential learning opportunities are student-centered, that thinking of how policies will impact actual students is student-centered).  Other times, we don’t seem to have consensus about what it Read More …

MOOCs & Badges: Interrogating “Open”

When I first got introduced to the world of OERs, I was skeptical.  Despite being a pretty avid user of technology in my English courses, I have also generally been one of those intellectually whiny faculty members at my university who always throws a wrench into online initiatives by worrying (way out loud) that we Read More …

What Does Campaign Finance Have to Do With Open Access to Education?

Just left Lawrence Lessig‘s keynote talk “Walking While Chewing Gum” here at OpenEd14. It was inspiring, and I found myself reevaluating my goals as an academic in much the same way as I did after hearing Cable Green speak at my home university recently.  Both Lessig and Green are Creative Commons guys, leaders in the Read More …

Practical Examples for Plymouth State University

Here are some practical ideas to go with the more theoretical vision I laid out in my 2014 talk at Plymouth State University, “Rethinking Student Engagement.” How can we reintegrate knowledge so that the historically constructed boundaries between fields can be made porous? Develop cooperative templated majors that partner multiple departments together, which students could Read More …

Rethinking “Student Engagement”

Faculty Day 2014, Plymouth State University Robin DeRosa If I have a guiding principle in my own pedagogy and scholarship, it’s probably related to the idea that the question on the table usually masks conflicting and more compelling questions underneath. I always value it when a student undermines one of my well-intentioned assignments because she’s Read More …